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Commercial Deposit Safes

Front Loading And Rotary Hopper Depositories

FL DBL

FL DBL

 
  • Class B insurance rating with ½" thick high strength steel door
  • High strength steel body
  • U.L. listed Group 2 combination lock
  • Relocking device double locks against burglary attacks
  • Large diameter chrome steel bolts and force resistive handle
  • "Drill Beater" hardened alloy steel plate protects lock
  • Hinge side interlocks from inside to resist hinge removal
  • Rotary hopper & front load accepts most deposits
  • Color: SecureX gray
  • Bolt down holes

FL 20


FL 20
          Options:

RH 27


RH 27
 tl15by.jpg (992 bytes)
  • Key locking dial (shown)
  • Key-Op lock instead of combination lock
  • Electronic digital lock with built-in time delay or dual custody
  • Custom sizes and colors

FL 27
 

FL 27
 

27

Model #

Interior Dimensions (in.)

Exterior Dimensions (in.)

Interior Volume (ft³)

Weight (lbs.)

Height

Width

Depth

Height

Width

Depth

FL-20

12½

13½

10¼

20

14

14

1.04

136

FL-27

19½

15½

15½

27

16

19

2.71

209

RH-27

19½

15½

15½

16

19

2.71

209

FL-DBL (top)

12

20½

17½

33

21

21

2.49

345

FL-DBL (bottom)

12

20½

17½

.

.

.

.

.

All specifications are subject to change without notice. The best protection is a safe tailored to your needs and cash risk. Consultation with a security professional is advised.

© Copyright 2000 Securex Underlicence .

BURGLARY SAFE BURGLARY SAFE BURGLARY SAFE BURGLARY SAFE BURGLARY SAFE BURGLARY SAFE


SECUREX AMERICAS AND THE UL TEST

untitled1image.jpg (6037 bytes)SecureX Americas arrived from the great White North (Canada, eh) at the UL testing facilities, about to ensure its first UL testing on its TL15 and TL30 safes. Having done much research on the design of safes, consulted all the 'experts' and called the Psychic Friends one last time, it was show down time. It was just SecureX members, the UL testers, our TL15 and TL30 safes and all the antacid we could carry!

Having taken exact measurements of the bolt work, including the relockers, the UL team began the 30 minute drill attack on the TL30 mechanism. Hooking up their magnetic drill press to the 3" thick door, they began to drill through the steel plate and concrete. The drill press held until they encountered armoured louvers welded at 45 degree angles throughout the door. Perhaps my prayers the night before had paid off. The magnetic drill press was not holding. They changed to a brand new one, thinking the first was defective. No luck, they were going to free-hand it.

untitled1image2.jpg (10055 bytes)Alternating between pounding the louvers down and drilling, they began to make progress to the ½" hardened steel plate. This steel plate, new to the industry, has a higher psi than manganese. One of the testers commented that he had never seen a hard plate do this before, as he removed a mushroomed 3/8" drill bit - one of many to be used that day.

With glass plate protection, an additional ½" thick lock bolt protector to stop lock bolt punching, and one more relocker to neutralize, test number one was soon over! The safe passed the first phase.

The TL30/TL15 body test was next. The 3 ½" thick body was similar in thickness to those of other manufactures that failed, so we had to find some way to buy more time.

The testers, using a Milwaukee circular saw with a carbide blade, cut a square in the body of the safe. They then proceeded to use chisels, fire axes and sledge hammers to peel the outer skin downwards. The Z-brackets which were welded closely together on the external and internal plates anchored them deep inside the body; this slowed down the peeling attack.

With time and a few more hits though, the K12 barrier material was exposed. I won't lie, I was nervous. Our engineer swore to its toughness. Would it be able to withstand the large pick and fire axes that now were being wielded at it mercilessly? These guys attacked the concrete as if their lives depended on it - we were fearfully impressed.

The clock was counting down. They had enough of an opening to put in a carbide hole saw, but not enough time to make any hole whatsoever. Test number two was over! The safe passed the second phase.

There was still at least one additional attack to go - or more, if the testers were unsure of the safe. The dreaded door attack consisted of making a 6 square inch or equivalent size hole through the door. With two stop watches the supervising engineer, John Savickas begins the clock only when the testers are working on the safe. This doesn't mean setting up the tools, attaching the drills or inspecting and conferring. Only as the destructive attack is taking place does the clock start. Often this will go on for mere seconds at a time and then stop again. This TL30 drill attack took two professionals over 2 ½ hours, including endless equipment changes and consultations. This obviously represents the most experienced people there are, under ideal conditions (who don't have to worry about waking the neighbours or burglar alarms).

On to the door attack. At this point everyone was well fed and rested. Following the morning's body attack, the UL testers approached the safe with new vigour. They began by cutting a large square using the carbide circular saw. Due to the thickness of the steel plate they were unable to peel it down and had to work hard to remove it. The Z-brackets once again added more difficulty to this task.

Next they had to remove the monolith. The steel fibers kept the monolith from falling apart and made it hard to remove. In addition, the concrete was anchored within the steel louvers, which to the admiration of one of the UL testers, was the perfect dimension and spacing to be effective. If done any other way it could have made their job easier. Once the concrete was out they began to use hand grinders and circular saws to individually cut and remove each louver.

As the clock counted down, nearing 30 minutes, the pace became frantic, as they desperately tried to cut the ½" thick hardened steel plate. No way. The clock counted down and congratulations were in order! I got the distinct impression that they were surprised that a first-timer through the UL testing laboratory had passed, and commented that SecureX had done its homework and prepared properly.

A good safe doesn't need a UL label to say that it's good, but having watched the testing first hand I am convinced that having a UL label is important. It means you adhere to a very high standard - something that helps the end-user rest easier.

SecureX Americas with offices in the USA and Canada, manufactures a full line of 50+ models of safes, including C-rate composites, fire safes, depositories, floor and under-the-counter safes, and now, UL listed TL15 and TL30 safes.